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  • Chris Hall

Specificity of Training


There is a complex relationship between three specific areas when training.

General training, such as weight circuits and spin classes offer a non specific programme designed for exactly what it says, general. The issues are that this frequently fails to enhance the specifics required for the precise motor patterns, however this can be a good starting point.

Specific training can be looked at as a body builder would. Target the precise areas required for improved success and build them into a programme that immediately improves the abilities to fulfill the requirements of the overall pattern. In golf, this should fit in to the specific style and technique of the player.

Skill training, where practise develops specific motor patterns gained from the previous two protocols

Specify abilities are targeted at the areas required to produce the motor patterns and enhance those areas. This could be specific areas of mobility, flexibility, strength, speed or endurance. This is the key area for improvement and development as these areas work specifically in tandem with the levelling abilities and allow progression in a specialised and specific manor.

Non-specific abilities are the general training protocols aimed at non specific areas. This is the most common form of training and covers a large range and variety of protocols. However this can often have a negative impact on the motor ability. An example of this would be excessive training to increase absolute strength, which can see a reduction in specific speed.

A negative effect on golf swings can also occur when the momentum transfer timings through an imbalance of lower body chain. mid body chain and the upper chain develops through poor initial assessment of the student.

Research has suggested that once a motor pattern has been trained or untrained recreating an old pattern is almost impossible therefore conditioning coaches should take great care when applying programmes to players.


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